Politicians

  • In 1993, President Bill Clinton proclaimed himself the first anti-smoking president.  Mrs. Clinton declared the White House smoke-free. However, President Clinton continued to smoke cigars and admitted to having smoked marijuana while in college, although noting, “I didn’t inhale.”
  • While serving as Senate majority leader, a post he won in 1981 in part due to support from North Carolina Senator Jesse Helms, Bob Dole blocked all significant new regulations of the tobacco industry. Philip Morris and R. J. Reynolds became major contributors to Dole’s political campaigns and the Dole Foundation for Employment of People with Disabilities.
  • During his 1996 presidential campaign, Dole defended his longstanding acceptance of funds from the tobacco industry and downplayed the dangers of smoking. “We know it’s [tobacco] not good for kids,” he said, “but a lot of other things aren’t good…Some would say milk’s not good.”

Jerry Holbert
Boston Herald
1999

Jerry Holbert
The Garden Island (Lihue, Hawaii)
July 2, 2009

Mike Smith
Las Vegas Sun
September 27, 1998

Herb Block
The Washington Post, page A22
January 12, 1979

Matt Wuerker
Circa 1996

It’s not about the stupid old plant to me. It’s about the insanity of advertising and marketing, the evil genius of Joe Camel. Just imagine what could be accomplished by shifting the billions of bucks we spend pushing cigarettes to a campaign for a ‘Robbie-get-off-my-lard-ass-and-get-some-damn-exercise-Racoon’ or a “Skinny Eddie-ditch-the-junk-food-Squirrel.’”

~ Matt Wuerker

Herb Block
The Miami Herald, page 7A
December 10, 1977

Graeme MacKay
Hamilton Spectator (Ontario)
November 24, 1999

This cartoon shows both the Prime Minister and the Finance minister of Canada stroking and nourishing the tobacco cow as it is being milked for its precious revenues. Meanwhile, it’s the Health Minister of the day whose role is to brand the great money maker as dangerous to the health of Canadians.

~ Graeme MacKay

Terry Mosher “Aislin”
Montreal Gazette
1996

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